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Posted on: July 25, 2022

Beavercreek City Council votes to place street and police levies on November ballot

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During their meeting Monday, July 25, Beavercreek City Council voted to place two levies, one for the city’s streets and another for the police department, on the November 2022 ballot to address the city’s increasing costs and demand for services.

Councilmembers passed Resolution 22-36 for residents to vote on a 2.15 mills street levy. Funds generated by this levy will be used to maintain and increase service levels with respect to the city’s streets, which would include the hiring of 5 additional employees. This proposed measure would raise property taxes beginning in 2023 by $75.25 per $100,000 of appraised value.

Council also passed Resolution 22-37 to add a 2.5 mills police levy to the ballot this fall. Funds generated by this levy will be used to maintain and increase the police department’s service levels, including the hiring of 5 additional police officers; purchase and maintain needed equipment; and provide additional funding for long-term capital for a facility. If approved, this levy would raise property taxes beginning in 2023 by $87.50 per $100,000 of appraised value.

Click here to read more about the city's need for additional public service employees and police officers.

“Our city’s expenses are outpacing revenue, which is why the city is proposing these levies,” said Mayor Bob Stone. “Placing these levies on the November ballot empowers city residents to help determine the funding and service levels of Beavercreek’s streets and police department. Beavercreek residents made it clear to council in May they did not want an income tax; therefore, we are presenting these levies to our citizens for consideration.”

The last time Beavercreek voters passed a levy for additional funding for the police department was in 2014; the last street levy approved by voters was in 2016.

“With the significant growth that has occurred in the city over the last several years and the demand for services increasing, the city’s public service division and police department needs additional employees in order to maintain and improve service levels,” said City Manager, Pete Landrum.

Currently, the city receives 16.35 percent of a city resident’s total property tax bill.

Click here to watch the council meeting.